IBS: Causes, Symptoms, Triggers, Diets, and Treatment

Diet & Nutrition, IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder that affects the gastrointestinal tract, the stomach, and the intestines. If left untreated, IBS can become a chronic condition that one may need to manage long-term. The good news is that irritable bowel syndrome does not increase one’s risk of colorectal cancer or change in bowel tissues.

 

IBS Symptoms

The most common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome include:

  • Abdominal Pain
  • Bloating
  • Cramping
  • Change in frequency of passing bowel movements
  • Change in appearance of the bowel movement
  • Mucus in the stool
  • A sensation of incomplete stool evacuation

These symptoms of IBS vary from one person to another. However, they are usually present for a long time and can be seen by an IBS symptoms checker. Spastic colon symptoms can be controlled by managing lifestyle, stress, and diet. Severe symptoms are treatable through medication and counseling.

 

When to Seek Medical Attention

One should seek medical attention once they notice one or more IBS symptoms or any change in bowel movements. Severe symptoms may indicate a severe condition such as colon cancer. The severe symptoms include:

  • Rectal bleeding
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Weight loss
  • Diarrhea at night
  • Anemia
  • Pain during a bowel movement

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome ICD10 (IBS ICD10)

According to WHO’s medical classification of digestive system diseases, Irritable bowel syndrome is accorded the code ICD-10-CM. In addition to the icd10 code for IBS, two codes apply to IBS: K00-K95 digestive system diseases and K58 irritable bowel syndrome. ICD-10-CM K58.9 is grouped within diagnostic-related groups (MS-DRG v40.0) esophagitis, gastroenteritis, and miscellaneous digestive disorders with and without MCC.

 

IBS Triggers

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) triggers are factors that can cause or exacerbate symptoms of the condition. These triggers can vary from person to person, but common ones include certain foods, stress, hormonal changes, and medications. Some people with IBS find that consuming certain types of food or drink, such as fatty or spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, or artificial sweeteners, can trigger symptoms. Stress is another common trigger, as the gut and brain are closely connected, and stress can cause changes in gut motility and sensitivity. Hormonal changes, particularly in women, can also play a role in triggering IBS symptoms. Medications, such as antibiotics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), can also trigger symptoms in some people. Identifying and avoiding triggers can be an important part of managing IBS.

The symptoms of IBS are triggered by:

 

Food

Although an allergy to certain foods does not cause IBS, people with IBS experience severe symptoms when they consume particular foods and beverages. These can include milk, carbonated drinks, beans, citrus fruits, alcoholic drinks, dairy products, and wheat.

Food is a common trigger for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in some individuals. Certain foods, such as fatty or spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners, can irritate the lining of the gut and exacerbate symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. Additionally, some individuals with IBS may have specific food intolerances, such as lactose intolerance or gluten sensitivity, that can trigger symptoms. However, not all individuals with IBS are sensitive to the same foods, and triggers can vary widely from person to person. Identifying and avoiding individual trigger foods can be a helpful strategy in managing IBS symptoms.

Consulting with a registered dietitian can also be beneficial in developing a personalized diet plan for managing IBS symptoms.

 

Stress

Stress is a well-established trigger for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. In individuals with IBS, stress can cause changes in the gut-brain axis, leading to alterations in gut motility, sensitivity, and immune function. Stress can also affect the gut microbiome, which plays a crucial role in gut health and function. The exact mechanisms by which stress triggers IBS symptoms are not fully understood, but it is thought to involve a complex interplay between the gut, the central nervous system, and the immune system.

Effective management of stress through relaxation techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and other stress reduction strategies is an important part of a holistic approach to managing IBS symptoms.

 

Can Coffee Cause IBS?

Coffee is a common trigger for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in some individuals. The caffeine in coffee is a stimulant that can increase gut motility and cause contractions in the intestines, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloating. Additionally, coffee can irritate the lining of the gut, exacerbating symptoms in individuals with IBS. However, not all individuals with IBS are sensitive to coffee, and some may be able to tolerate small amounts without experiencing symptoms.

It is important to note that other factors, such as stress, diet, and medications, can also trigger or exacerbate IBS symptoms. If coffee appears to be a trigger for an individual’s symptoms, reducing or eliminating coffee consumption may help manage IBS symptoms.

 

IBS Risk Factors

People who are more likely to experience IBS symptoms include:

  • People under the age of 50 years old
  • Females: Estrogen therapy before or after menopause increases the risk factor of IBS.
  • Family history of IBS: People from families with a history of IBS are likely to have IBS. One’s environment plays a factor too.
  • Mental Health Issues: People with a history of anxiety, depression, or mental health issues are likely to get IBS.

 

Related IBS Complications

Diarrhea or chronic constipation can cause hemorrhoids. In addition, IBS can cause:

 

Low Quality of Life

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can significantly lower the quality of life for people who suffer from the condition. The symptoms of IBS, such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements, can be distressing and unpredictable, making it difficult for individuals to engage in daily activities and maintain social relationships. IBS can also impact work productivity and attendance, leading to financial strain and added stress. The anxiety and depression that often accompany IBS can further contribute to a reduced quality of life, as individuals may feel isolated, embarrassed, and overwhelmed. The chronic nature of IBS can also make it challenging to manage and can lead to frustration and feelings of hopelessness. Overall, IBS can have a significant negative impact on physical, emotional, and social well-being, highlighting the importance of effective treatment and support.

 

Mood Disorders

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been shown to be associated with mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. The exact relationship between IBS and mood disorders is complex and not yet fully understood, but it is thought to be related to the close relationship between the gut and brain. The chronic and unpredictable nature of IBS symptoms can cause significant psychological distress, leading to anxiety and depression. Additionally, changes in the gut microbiome and inflammation in the gut have been linked to mood disorders. The impact of IBS on daily functioning and social relationships can also contribute to the development or worsening of mood disorders. Addressing both the physical and psychological aspects of IBS through a holistic approach to treatment can help improve mood and overall quality of life.

 

IBS Weight Loss

The connection between IBS and weight loss is that irritable bowel syndrome can cause weight gain in some patients. However, IBS makes it hard for individuals suffering from it to lose or maintain a moderate weight. 

The difficulty in losing weight is due to the challenges of exercising and adhering to a strict IBS diet for weight loss while avoiding IBS symptoms in females. Losing weight is only possible if the person follows the absolute best diet for IBS to help manage the symptoms or if they experience anxiety about food and are not getting enough calories to maintain their current weight.

 

IBS and GERD

Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when stomach acid refluxes in the esophagus due to a dysfunctional lower esophageal sphincter. Over time, GERD causes damage to the cells and tissues in the esophagus. IBS is a functional disorder and often includes GERD. These two diseases share disease mechanisms, although they are not clearly understood.

One shared disease mechanism is poor muscle function in the intestinal tract. The incoordination of muscles in the esophagus, intestines, and stomach contributes to IBS and GERD symptoms. Also, individuals with IBS and GERD have more difficulty sleeping than those with just one of the conditions. IBS is, however, more complicated and less understood than GERD, making the connection between these two conditions more complex.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are two separate conditions that can coexist and share similar symptoms. GERD is a digestive disorder characterized by acid reflux and heartburn, while IBS affects the large intestine and causes symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. However, some people with IBS may also experience symptoms of acid reflux and GERD, such as chest pain, difficulty swallowing, and regurgitation.

The close relationship between the gut and esophagus means that symptoms of one condition can impact the other. Effective treatment for both conditions may involve dietary and lifestyle changes, medication, and management of stress. A healthcare provider can help determine the best course of treatment based on an individual’s specific symptoms and medical history.

 

IBS and Acid Reflux

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and acid reflux are two common gastrointestinal conditions that can coexist in some individuals. Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is a condition in which stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and chest pain. IBS, on the other hand, is a condition that affects the functioning of the digestive system, causing symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea.

The connection between IBS and acid reflux is not fully understood, but research suggests that the two conditions may share some underlying mechanisms. Both conditions may be related to dysfunction in the gut-brain axis, which affects the communication between the brain and the digestive system.

Management of both IBS and acid reflux typically involves lifestyle modifications, such as dietary changes and stress reduction techniques, as well as medications to alleviate symptoms. Avoiding trigger foods and eating smaller, more frequent meals may be helpful for managing symptoms of both conditions. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H2 blockers may be prescribed to reduce acid production in the stomach and alleviate symptoms of acid reflux.

It is important for individuals with both IBS and acid reflux to work with a healthcare professional to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses their specific symptoms and triggers. Regular monitoring and management of both conditions can improve quality of life and overall health.

 

Are you an IBS Vegan?

Individuals who follow a vegan diet may experience relief from symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) due to the high fiber content in plant-based foods. However, some high-fiber foods can exacerbate symptoms of IBS, such as bloating, gas, and abdominal pain. Therefore, it is important for vegans with IBS to identify and avoid trigger foods.

A low-FODMAP diet, which restricts certain types of carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed by the small intestine and can contribute to IBS symptoms, may be helpful for vegans with IBS. Some high-FODMAP vegan foods to avoid or limit include wheat, garlic, onions, beans, lentils, chickpeas, and some fruits and vegetables. It is important for vegans to work with a registered dietitian to develop a personalized low-FODMAP meal plan that meets their nutrient needs.

Vegans with IBS may also benefit from incorporating probiotics and prebiotics into their diet, which can promote healthy gut bacteria and alleviate symptoms of IBS. Fermented foods such as kimchi, sauerkraut, and tempeh are good sources of probiotics, while prebiotic-rich foods include oats, bananas, and legumes.

It is important for vegans with IBS to ensure that they are meeting their nutrient needs, as a vegan diet can sometimes be low in certain nutrients such as vitamin B12, iron, and calcium. Supplementation may be necessary to prevent deficiencies.

Overall, a vegan diet can be a healthy and effective way for individuals with IBS to manage their symptoms, but it is important to work with a healthcare professional to develop a personalized treatment plan.

 

Is IBS and Spastic Colon the Same Thing?

Spastic colon is another term used to describe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a chronic gastrointestinal disorder characterized by symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The term “spastic” refers to the involuntary contractions or spasms that occur in the muscles of the intestinal wall, which can cause discomfort and changes in bowel movements.

While the exact cause of IBS is unknown, it is believed to be related to dysfunction in the gut-brain axis, which affects the communication between the brain and the digestive system. Stress and anxiety can also exacerbate symptoms of spastic colon or IBS, as they can trigger spasms and other gut-related symptoms.

Treatment for spastic colon or IBS typically involves a combination of lifestyle modifications, such as dietary changes, stress reduction techniques, and regular exercise, as well as medications to alleviate symptoms. Fiber supplements and probiotics may also be recommended to promote gut health and regulate bowel movements.

It is important for individuals with spastic colon or IBS to work with a healthcare professional to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses their specific symptoms and triggers. While there is no cure for spastic colon or IBS, management of symptoms can improve quality of life and overall health.

 

What Causes Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

The exact cause of IBS remains unknown, however, some factors play a role in IBS. These factors include:

 

Intestinal Contractions

Intestinal walls have a mucus lining that contracts as food moves through the digestive tract. Long-lasting and strong contractions can cause diarrhea, bloating, and gas. On the other hand, weak contractions slow down food passage and cause dry and hard stools.

Intestinal contractions are a key factor in the development and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is characterized by changes in gut motility, which can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. In individuals with IBS, the intestinal contractions that move food through the digestive tract can become irregular or overly intense, leading to symptoms. Additionally, the sensitivity of the gut to these contractions can also be altered in individuals with IBS, leading to pain and discomfort.

The exact cause of changes in gut motility in IBS is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to a combination of factors, including changes in the gut microbiome, stress, and psychological factors.

 

Nervous system

When your abdomen stretches due to stool or gas it can cause discomfort and issues with nerves. Poor coordination of signals between the intestines and the brain can cause the body to react to changes in the digestive tract and cause constipation, pain, and diarrhea.

The nervous system plays a significant role in the development and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The gut has its own nervous system, called the enteric nervous system, which communicates with the central nervous system, including the brain. This communication is known as the gut-brain axis and can be affected by stress, anxiety, and other psychological factors.

In individuals with IBS, changes in the enteric nervous system can cause alterations in gut motility and sensitivity, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. Furthermore, stress and other psychological factors can trigger or exacerbate symptoms, highlighting the importance of a holistic approach to managing IBS that includes both physical and psychological strategies.

 

Change in Gastrointestinal Gut Microbes

Gut microbes, viruses, fungi, and bacteria are crucial to gut health. Any changes in the gut microbes might cause IBS.

Research suggests that a change in the composition and diversity of gastrointestinal gut microbes can contribute to the development and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The gut microbiome plays a critical role in digestion, immune function, and overall health.

A disruption in the balance of gut microbes, such as an overgrowth of certain bacteria or a reduction in beneficial microbes, can cause inflammation and changes in gut motility, leading to symptoms of IBS. Additionally, the gut microbiome can interact with the brain through the gut-brain axis, influencing mood and stress levels, which are also linked to IBS. Strategies for managing IBS symptoms may include dietary changes, probiotics, prebiotics, and other treatments that target the gut microbiome.

 

Stress 

Stress-induced alterations act on the gut-brain axis triggering gut overactivity and hence causing IBS symptoms flare-up. In some people, the brain becomes underactive, slowing down the gut and hence causing gas, constipation, and stomach discomfort.

tress is a well-known trigger for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, including changes in gut motility and sensitivity. In individuals with IBS, stress can cause the intestinal contractions that move food through the digestive tract to become irregular, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements. The connection between stress and gut function is complex and involves the gut-brain axis, which is the communication network between the gut and the central nervous system.

Stress can also affect the gut microbiome and the immune system, further contributing to IBS symptoms. Management of stress through relaxation techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and other stress reduction strategies is an important part of a holistic approach to managing IBS symptoms.

 

Infection

Diarrhea caused by a virus or bacteria can cause an infection known as gastroenteritis. Bacteria overgrowth in the gut can also cause IBS.

Infection can be a trigger for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in some individuals. Acute gastroenteritis, caused by bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections, can lead to chronic symptoms of IBS in some individuals, a condition known as post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS). The exact mechanisms by which infection leads to the development of IBS are not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to changes in the gut microbiome, inflammation, and alterations in gut motility and sensitivity.

Symptoms of PI-IBS can be severe and long-lasting, and management may involve a range of strategies, including dietary changes, medication, and stress management. Early and effective treatment of acute gastroenteritis may help reduce the risk of developing PI-IBS.

 

IBS Treatment

Treatment for IBS focuses on eliminating symptoms in order to live a normal life.

Depending on your IBS symptoms, there are different medications and recommendations you can explore. IBS treatments and medications can include the following:

Laxatives: Over-the-counter laxatives such as Miralax or Philips’ Milk of Magnesia should be part of your IBS constipation diet.

Fiber Supplements: Fiber supplements such as Metamucil, alongside fluids will control constipation.

Anticholinergic Medications: Medications such as Bentyl relieve painful bowel movements and are recommended for people with diarrhea. There are some potential side effects with Bentyl, including, but not limited to, dry mouth and blurred vision.

Anti-diarrheal Medications: There are medications and prescriptions to control diarrhea such as Loperamide. The health practitioner may prescribe a bile acid binder such as Colesevelam, Colestipol, or Cholestyramine.

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants (SSRI): SSRI antidepressants such as Paxil and Prozac minimize pain and constipation in depressed people.

Tricyclic Antidepressants: These antidepressants relieve depression and inhibit neuron activity in the intestines. As a result, they reduce pain. Patients with abdominal pain and no signs of depression can take Pamelor, Tofranil, or Norpramin.

Pain Medications: Neurontin and Lyrica can ease bloating or severe pain.

Lotronex: Lotronex is recommended for women who have not responded well to other IBS treatments. This medication relaxes the colon and slows down the movement of waste in the lower bowel. Only certain healthcare providers can prescribe this medication.

Xifaxan: This antibiotic minimizes diarrhea and stops bacteria overgrowth in the gut.

Linzess: Also known as Linaclotide, Linzess increases fluid secretion in the small intestine to help one pass stool. Although it may cause diarrhea, one should take it about 1 hour before eating.

Lubirpostone (Amitiza): It boosts fluid secretion in the small intestine. It is approved for women suffering from constipation.

Eluxadoline (Viberzi): This medication increases muscle tone in the rectum and lowers muscle contractions in the intestines. It can cause side effects such as mild constipation, abdominal pain, and nausea.

 

Home Remedies for IBS

When prescription options aren’t readily available, there are IBS home treatments that one can use to ease the symptoms. Effective home remedies for IBS include:

 

Herbs for IBS and Best Foods for an IBS Flare Up

There are several herbs that have been traditionally used to manage symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Peppermint oil is one of the most well-researched and commonly used herbs for IBS. It has been shown to reduce symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and gas. Other herbs that may have potential benefits for IBS include ginger, chamomile, fennel, and artichoke leaf. These herbs may help reduce inflammation, improve gut motility, and ease digestive discomfort. However, it is important to note that herbs are not a substitute for conventional medical treatment, and it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using herbs for IBS.

Peppermint Oil: Peppermint oil relaxes gut muscles to ease food passage through the gastrointestinal gut. Those with diarrhea can experience relief from bloating, urgency, and abdominal pain using a special tablet that releases peppermint oil in the small intestine.

Ginger: Ginger is famous for reducing bloating and gas. The active ingredient in ginger is gingerol which is responsible for antiemetic, antibacterial, and soothing properties which restore gut function.

Aloe Vera: Available in capsule form or juice, aloe vera treats constipation and diarrhea. Aloe vera is often considered a complementary therapy treatment.

Triphala: This herb is made from the Amalaki tree fruit and reduces bloating, abdominal pain, and constipation.

Chamomile: Coming from the chamomile plant, it is consumed as a capsule, liquid, or tea. Chamomile reduces the spasms in the gut responsible for causing pain.

 

Eat More Fiber

With Irritable bowel syndrome dietary fiber cleans up the bowels and helps alleviate symptoms. Incorporate vegetables, fruits, and whole grains for an irritable bowel syndrome high fiber diet that works. You can also get fiber supplements such as Metamucil or Citrucel.

Soluble fiber, found in foods such as oats, fruits, and vegetables, can help regulate bowel movements and improve gut motility. It can also help reduce constipation and diarrhea, which are common symptoms of IBS. However, some individuals with IBS may be sensitive to certain types of fiber, such as insoluble fiber found in bran and whole grains, which can exacerbate symptoms. It is important to introduce fiber gradually and monitor symptoms to identify any triggers.

A registered dietitian can provide personalized recommendations for incorporating fiber into a diet for managing IBS.

 

Probiotics

Probiotics refer to the good bacteria that is in the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics are found in certain dietary supplements and foods such as yogurt and kimchi. Studies show that probiotics can relieve IBS symptoms.

Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that live in the gut and can have potential benefits for individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Studies suggest that certain strains of probiotics may help reduce symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, and irregular bowel movements in individuals with IBS. Probiotics may work by restoring balance to the gut microbiome and reducing inflammation. However, the effectiveness of probiotics for IBS can vary widely depending on the specific strain and the individual’s gut microbiome.

It is important to consult with a healthcare professional before taking probiotics for IBS and to choose a high-quality product from a reputable manufacturer.

 

Ayurvedic Treatment for IBS

Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine from India, offers several treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). According to Ayurveda, IBS is caused by an imbalance of the three doshas, or energy types, in the body. Treatment may involve dietary modifications, such as avoiding certain foods and spices, as well as lifestyle changes, including stress reduction and regular exercise. Herbal remedies, such as triphala and licorice root, may also be used to improve digestion and reduce inflammation. Ayurvedic treatments for IBS are typically personalized based on an individual’s dosha type and symptoms.

 

Yoga

Reducing stress with methods such as meditation and yoga can relieve IBS. You can practice meditation and yoga from home or take classes. Yoga helps one be in touch with their senses, creating a positive feeling and helping promote a sense of mindfulness that can help one cope with the symptoms.

Through yoga practices, one restores the normal signals in the nervous system and relieves IBS symptoms. A resting pose in Yoga–Savasana, destresses the body from anxiety and stress. 

Also, pranayama increases sympathetic tone levels helping people suffering from diarrhea.

 

Gut Directed Hypnotherapy

Gut hypnotherapy is a type of therapy that aims to alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through relaxation techniques and suggestions for improved gut function. The therapy involves guided relaxation and visualization techniques, along with suggestions for improved gut function and reduced stress levels. The goal is to help individuals with IBS better manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life. Studies have shown that gut-directed hypnotherapy can be an effective treatment for IBS, with up to 80% of individuals experiencing symptom improvement. It is important to seek out a qualified healthcare professional with experience in gut-directed hypnotherapy to ensure safe and effective treatment.

 

Metamucil for IBS

Metamucil is a brand of psyllium fiber supplement that is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of constipation and promote regular bowel movements. While there is limited research specifically on the effectiveness of Metamucil for IBS, some studies have found that psyllium fiber supplements can improve symptoms of IBS, particularly constipation-predominant IBS.

Psyllium fiber works by increasing the bulk and softness of stools, making them easier to pass, and by promoting regular bowel movements. In addition to alleviating constipation, psyllium fiber may also help to reduce abdominal pain and bloating associated with IBS.

Metamucil should be taken with plenty of water to prevent dehydration and to help the fiber move through the digestive system. It is important to start with a low dose and gradually increase to the recommended dose to prevent bloating and gas.

While Metamucil may be a helpful addition to a comprehensive treatment plan for IBS, it is important to work with a healthcare professional to develop an individualized plan that addresses all aspects of IBS, including diet, stress management, and medication as needed. Some people with IBS may not tolerate fiber supplements well, and other treatments may be necessary to manage their symptoms.

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Mental health therapies can be effective in helping to manage IBS symptoms. The brain and the gut communicate through nerve signals, and one can use that connection to improve digestive functions. 

CBT helps one improve the relationship between emotions, thoughts, and actions to minimize negative feelings and stress.

 

Exercise

When one exercises, the body releases endorphins which improve abdominal pain and act as a natural painkiller. Regular exercise lowers anxiety and depression– a couple of the leading causes of IBS.

Regular exercise can be a beneficial lifestyle modification for individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Exercise has been shown to help improve gut motility, reduce stress levels, and improve overall health and well-being. Low-intensity exercise, such as walking or yoga, may be especially helpful for individuals with IBS who may be sensitive to high-intensity or high-impact exercise. However, it is important to introduce exercise gradually and to monitor symptoms to identify any triggers.

 

Future IBS Treatments

By the day, researchers are investigating new IBS treatments. The latest research is on fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). FMT seeks to restore healthy bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract by placing a person’s processed stool into the intestine of a patient suffering from IBS. There are ongoing clinical trials to study fecal transplants.

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Diet Tips| What to Eat With an IBS Attack

Your diet is one of the main triggers for IBS symptoms. If you are wondering what to eat with an IBS flare-up, eat only foods and drink only fluids that do not cause any IBS symptoms. Some of the irritable bowel syndrome diet tips you can use to manage IBS are:

  • Take your time to chew food before swallowing
  • Eat small meals and spread them throughout your day
  • Avoid meals that overstimulate your gut
  • Track your food intake to know the foods that stimulate your symptoms so you can avoid them

Your healthcare provider may ask you to eliminate some foods from your diet, such as:

 

Gluten

Research indicates that IBS patients experience less severe symptoms once they stop consuming gluten, rye, barley, and wheat. This works for individuals who have celiac disease or not.

 

High-Gas Foods

Gas issues and bloating can be reduced by avoiding alcoholic beverages, certain foods, and carbonated drinks.

High-gas foods can exacerbate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in some individuals. These foods, such as beans, lentils, broccoli, and onions, can produce excess gas in the digestive tract, which can lead to bloating, abdominal pain, and flatulence. However, it is important to note that high-gas foods do not cause IBS but can aggravate existing symptoms. Each individual with IBS may have different trigger foods, and it is important to identify and avoid these foods to manage symptoms effectively.

 

FODMAPs

FODMAPs– fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) are in certain fruits, grains, and dairy products. The carbohydrates found in FODMAPs cause some people to experience IBS.

If you are unsure of the foods to avoid, you can consult a dietitian who can further guide you down the path of the correct anti-inflammatory diet. Individuals with severe or moderate symptoms can get counseling services to deal with the symptoms.  

 

IBS Constipation Diet

The best IBS constipation diet is one that is high in fiber and fluids, which can help regulate bowel movements and promote regularity. However, it is important to introduce fiber gradually and drink plenty of water to prevent bloating and discomfort. Some good sources of fiber for individuals with IBS constipation include whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. Foods that are rich in probiotics, such as yogurt and kefir, may also be helpful for improving gut health and reducing inflammation.

It is also important to avoid trigger foods that can exacerbate symptoms, such as high-fat foods, caffeine, alcohol, and spicy or acidic foods. Keeping a food diary and tracking symptoms can help identify trigger foods and guide dietary modifications. It may be helpful to work with a registered dietitian who can provide personalized recommendations and support for managing IBS constipation through diet. Other lifestyle modifications, such as regular exercise and stress reduction techniques, can also be helpful in managing symptoms.

 

IBS Cure

Since there is no sure cause for irritable bowel syndrome, there is no certainty that IBS can be cured. Living with IBS can be challenging since the symptoms of gas, bloating, and stomach pain influence one’s quality of life. IBS is, however, manageable. 

You can make lifestyle and dietary changes to manage the condition. We suggest to first consult with your healthcare provider for a treatment plan that works for you. 

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Umzu Natural Supplements: Taking Back Control of your Health

Umzu Natural Supplements: Taking Back Control of your Health

Umzu is becoming a brand name everyone has heard of, or seen across social media, with products like zuPoo, Redwood, Testro-X, and more.  Umzu supplements was founded in 2017 by Christopher Walker, a former software engineer turned health and fitness expert. Walker’s personal health struggles, including issues with weight gain, low energy, and hormonal imbalances, led him to extensively research natural methods for optimizing health and wellness. The company’s mission is to provide science-backed, natural solutions for improving health and well-being. Umzu’s products are formulated based on the principles of holistic health, addressing not just symptoms but underlying imbalances to promote long-term vitality.

Conquer Your Workout – Top 3 Best CrossFit Grips Ever

Conquer Your Workout – Top 3 Best CrossFit Grips Ever

CrossFit packs your fitness routines with high-intensity workouts and benefits, but it can really take its toll on your hands. You’re on the right page if you’re after the best CrossFit grips in the market. This training guide will help you discover the top three best CrossFit grips specifically designed for your workout. Regardless of where you stand on your fitness journey, choosing the top grips can significantly enhance your performance and prevent damaging blisters. Remember that it’s both about getting fitter and training smarter.

Core Time – Free Pilates Reformer Workout Plan PDF Guide

Core Time – Free Pilates Reformer Workout Plan PDF Guide

The most well-known piece of Pilates equipment is the Pilates reformer. This makes sense because the reformer is commanding on sight and even more compelling once you begin to use it and notice welcome changes in your body. You will see why once you download our free Pilates reformer workout plan pdf. Many Pilates studios have invested in reformers as participants flock to their classes, and more than ever, portable reformers to use in the home are also in demand. Pilates reformer exercises work for beginner or advanced students, so it doesn’t matter what fitness level you’re at to get started Let’s explore Pilates reformers, how they work, popular exercises, and some benefits to expect when working with them.

Banish the Bulge – 32 Foods That Burn Belly Fat Fast

Banish the Bulge – 32 Foods That Burn Belly Fat Fast

Are you trying to figure out how to lose belly fat fast? You’re not alone; the 2017-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) found that more than 30% of Americans were overweight with nearly 10% of the population suffering from severe obesity. Diet plays a major role in weight control. So, today, we’re listing 32 foods that burn belly fat fast. Check it out below!